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[I]
I have a question regarding Med school admission. I graduated from
dartmouth in 98 and decided upon medicine post-graduation. I

recently received my april MCAT scores and was very pleased.
However, I was thinking of applying next summer instead of this
summer. I have heard in the past that med schools do not accept mcat
scores that are older than 2 years, and do not accept course credit
that is older than 5 years. I don't know if there's any truth to
this, but I'm curious because I would enter med school in the fall of
2001, and my mcats were this past spring. Also, I took my chem
classes my first year of college in the winter of 95. Should I look
into this concern?

brian

------------
The AAMC ''recommends'' that students take the MCAT 18 months before they
expect to enter medical school. The date of the oldest MCAT score considered
by each school can be found in the Medical School Admissions Requirements
Book (more info at http://www.premed411.com/pages/pmr.html), you will need
to add one year to the dates given, so as to correct for a 2001 entrance
date. These corrected dates range from 1994-1999, but could change next
year. It looks like there is no problem, but I would recommend contacting
the schools that ask for the most recent MCAT dates, to see if they would
recommend that you retake the MCAT--I doubt that they will.

Med schools should receive and review all your transcripts. If you were a
graduate student they would focus primarily on your graduate record, but
would also be able to evaluate your undergraduate record. If you have just
an undergraduate record than they would look at that, including those
''ancient'' chem grades.
If you did well on the MCAT, then, unless there is some other compelling
reason for waiting, you should definitely apply next SPRING, NOT next
summer. Good Luck!

-Rich

 

[II]
I am a non traditional student with a BA in English from Boston University.
I am currently finishing up a BS in Physics from Purdue University with a
science GPA of 3.65. I have stellar recommendations, volenteer service, and
I worked for pediatric surgeons for 2 years. I took the MCAT in April, which
turned out to be the worst time in my semester. I did pretty badly. I
still meet the minimum requirements for the schools I want to go to, but the
are just a above minimum. I feel there is a discrepancy between my scores,
grades and experience. I did not release the scores from April because I was
very unsure of my performance at that time. I am going to take it again in
August. When I apply, will both scores be released. If not does that look
bad? (should I just send them both anyway?) Also, I realize academic
stress is not an excuse for doing poorly on the MCAT, but in my case it was.
I am not sure what to say when I am comfronted with this dicrepancy during
interview. Honesty is the best policy for me, but I don't what to seem like
i can't handle it either. Thank you. -Kim

------------

Kim, I think a good strategy is to release your scores if you score a few
points below where you want to be, and to withhold your scores if you did
''pretty badly.'' Your score will not be released unless you request it; see
the 1999 Announcement booklet that came with your MCAT application. What you
need to do is to prepare for, and do well on the August MCAT. When the
''secret'' April MCAT scores come up during an interview, be honest and BRIEF,
but don't make a big deal about it. You have a strong background, if you do
well in August, the April MCAT will only be a big deal if you turn it into
one. Good Luck.

-Rich

 

[III]
I realize that medical schools account for the difficulty of a
student's undergraduate institution so as to keep his/her GPA in
perspective. My question is: How much weight is given to more
competitive universities? Is there any one standard scale used
to determine how much a student's GPA should be inflated or
deflated? Thanks.

--------

For relatively unknown institutions there is a ''formula sheet''.
For better known institutions there is usually no need for one.
The weight given to a particular school's grades varies a bit from
one med school to another. The actual weighting factors are ''trade
secrets''.

-Rich

 

[IV]
Hello Rich, Thank you for taking my email. I am the proud
father of twin daughters. Both attend the University of Pittsburgh at
Johnstown (here in PA) in the field of Bio/Pre-med. Each has
successfully achieved a QPA of above 3.9 through very hard work and
diligence. They are members of the Division II basketball team, are
assistant coaches for a local high school softball team, involved in
the Christian Athletic Association, been inducted into the freshman
honor society, recently honored by UPJ for the ''Student Athlete(s)''
of the year, and inducted in the Golden Key Honor Society ( for
academic excellence) as well as the University of Pittsburgh (at
Pittsburgh) Scholars Award. Now my concern....they both took the MCATs
in April of 99. Just three days ago they received their results and
were very much devastated. Each wants to be a Doctor, one in the field
of Pathology, the other in the field of Orthopedics. One earned a
score of 27, and the other a score of 22. Both have taken up their
summers to go to different hospitals in the area and gain experience
in the medical field....observing, questioning, learning. Right now
they are at the Doylestown Hospital in a program which allows
prospective med-students the opportunity to be exposed, first-hand, to
many of the functions of medical care for the patient. My question is,
and sorry it took so long to get to this, what can I tell my daughters
since they are so emotionally distraught as a result of their MCAT
scores. (I guess I forgot to tell you that they will be Seniors come
this August)....Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for
your time and thoughtfulness.

------------

It sounds like your daughters have an excellent background and are
serious about wishing to pursue careers in medicine. I would explain
to them, that although there are no guarantees, if they work hard at
improving their MCAT scores they have a good chance. There are many
physicians who did not do that well the first time they took the MCAT.
A 27 may be enough to be admitted, but the odds are poor. A 27 could
be brought up to a 30, a competitive score, in time for the August
MCAT, while a 22 probably would require more time to bring up to a
competitive level. Being Seniors is not a major issue as far as
medical schools are concerned, although there may be other issues
associated with graduation, and one's future that come up on a
personal level.

The MCAT is an atypical test in that at least 50% of what is being
tested, is not what you know, but how you apply what you know, to
novel situations. Many good students due poorly the first time they
take the MCAT, even though they worked hard to prepare for it. It has
been my experience that some of these students are able to ''wake up''
to the fact that this style of test requires a different style of
preparation then other tests, including other standardized tests,
which they have taken in the past. In summary, I'd encourage your
daughters by telling them that others have improved their MCAT scores
and they can to, emphasizing that while there are no guarantees, they
have gotten this far, if this is what they want, they need to ''go for
it''. A basketball or softball analogy might even be appropriate.

Best wishes,

Rich

 

[V]
Thanks soooo much RIch for giving me advice..
i do understand now that i should send recommendation letters but is it with
the primary applications that i send it with or is it with the secondary
applications? Or just anytime after the primary applications.. ?
[anytime after
the primary application]

Also another thing that is concerning me is that i haven't taken my mcats
and thus i am worried that the prehalth advisor we have will say that he
can't write me that letter that is needed. Can he write a letter without
having the mcat scores?
[Yes, your MCAT scores will speak for themselves.]
What do you think?
Thanks a again..
[You're welcome.]
Ericka :)

[Rich :]

TOP^

 

[VI]
Rich,

I am currently attending a technical college and have taken a few
classes in order to transfer to a four year institution. This school offers
majors in Biology and Chemistry, which major would give me a better chance at
doing well on the MCAT and trying to get into Med School. Also, how much of
a factor is your high school grades and class ranking a factor in the Med
School selection process. Do your collegiate gpa count more or is it a
combination of MCAT, college gpa, and high school. My grades in high school
were not that great. But the thing is biology and chemistry are a piece of
cake. I need advice and your responce would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Marty

------07/09/99------

Marty,

I have good news, your high school grades and ranking are not important. The
two biggest pre-interview factors relating to medical school admission, are
MCAT and GPA, with the MCAT on average being a bit more important. Although
I love chemistry, and although 47% of Chemistry majors were accepted to Med.
School as opposed to 38% of Biology majors in the 1998-99 entering class, I
think that for most folks a bio. major is a better bet. It is generally
easier to obtain a high GPA with a biology major. A high GPA with a
chemistry major carries more weight, than the same GPA as a biology major,
but if you do not do well in chemistry, the lower GPA will hurt far more
than the chem. major will help. As far as the MCAT, a biology major is more
useful.

On the other hand, in 1998-99, 38% of applicants were bio. majors, while
less than 6% were chem. majors. That means that chem. majors will stand out
when admission decisions are made, and this will be to their advantage.

Here's a trick: If you save your final credits to complete a chem. major
till after your application goes out, you can have your chem. major without
jeopardizing your GPA. Chemistry may not be cake when it comes time for
Physical Chemistry.

Good Luck!

 

[VII]
My nephew is 18, and has just graduated from high school in France,
where he has lived for the past 12 years. He is an American citizen
and completely bilingual. He wants to attend medical school in the
United States, but would prefer to attend college in France. Do you
think this will hurt his chances of acceptance at medical school?
What can he do in the meantime to enhance his chances?

Thanks for any advice you can give.

------07/06/99------

It may hurt his chances. Some schools do not accept credits from foreign
institutions. Other schools who do, may be unable or unwilling to fairly
evaluate your nephew's academic record. Beyond this, my knowledge about this
situation is quite limited. I would recommend contacting the AAMC to find
out more.

-Rich

 

[VIII]
Hello there.

I have a B.A. in Philosophy and I want to go back to school in medicine. I'll
need to complete all the basic science requisites before entering into medical
school. Do you know of programs that exist for a post-baccalaureat who is
working full-time. Have you heard of any 'evening' tracks for people in my
predicament.

Please respond if you get a chance.

Thanks,

Tom

------07/15/99------
A ''post-bac'' program is essentially a premed advisor and a group of classes
and tests that do not conflict with each other. Some schools advertise their
''program'' and others do not, but these schools may still offer courses that
will fit your needs. For example, here in Miami the University of Miami
offers a post-bac program, but it is during the day. I have never heard of
Florida International University mentioning a post-bac program, but since
they cater to older students they offer a lot of evening classes. What you
need to do is to do some research. The internet would be my choice, but much
the same information can be obtained on paper in a library. You will often
obtain only partial information, but based on this information you can
decide to write, call, or email for additional information. What you want to
find is an institution that not only meets your needs, but also maximizes
your chance of entering medical school. Finally, if you can find a premed
advisor who has been in the job for ten years or more, talk to them first
before you start your search, that should save you considerable time. Good
luck.

-Rich

 

[IX]
Dear Rich:

I have been in your site and over looking what you have. I am a physician
assistant and graduated 1998. I am seriously looking to go to medical
school. The one thing is that I have not taken organic chem. or physics.
Without these courses is it possible to get a 26 or higher on the MCAT? I
work full-time in a surgery group and I am not sure if I could take a course
at night. I know that if this is what I want I need to make sacrifices. I
just can't do it right now and I am not getting any younger. With a review
course is it possible? If so, when are they? I live in Miami too.

Please help! Any advice is helpful.
Julie

------07/15/99------

I understand your concerns regarding ''not getting any younger'', but review
courses, no matter how good the course and the teacher, cannot substitute
for organic and physics classes. Review courses are designed to review, not
to teach. I would guess the odds of making a 26, with or without a review
course, to be significantly less than one in twenty. I'm sorry its not what
you wanted to hear, but unless you are extremely gifted in these areas, the
odds are not in your favor.

-Rich

 

[X]
> Dear Rich:
> I am kind of in a bind about my app, and I want to know if I would have
> better luck playing craps in Vegas than med school. Oh, I am applying for
> the first time. I just sent off my AMCAS application on July 15. It took me
> so long to get the money, I never felt so poor. The thing is this: I feel so
> shaky about it being gone. Did I do everything right? My school (I graduated
> in May) was ABSOLUTELY NO HELP WHATSOEVER! I felt like I was drowning and no
> one threw a LifeSaver. The pre-med committee made it a point to take out a
> can of verbal whop-ass on anyone who didn't have a 4.0 . I went at it alone:
> I went to Lucent freshman year and did some webpage designs, got laid off
> (I'm 18 and I got laid off, mergers....) I went to U of Cinn. in OH
> sophomore year and did environmental work (Clean up the Ohio river near
> Applachia) I went to CWRU junior year and did some shadowing throught MMEP,
> now I am out of school and I work for J&J and drug lobbysits, where I
> network with senators and drug company CEOs and get them to make the issue
> of using, taking, and selling OTC and prescips not so bad to the public. I
> had (as of 6/1/99) a 3.4 GPA, and a 23,S on the MCAT. I am not sure if race
> matters anymore with Affirmative Action the guillitone over my head, but I
> am a 21 yr. SBF. If anyone can be honest, and NOT HARSH, I would be really
> grateful. Otherwise, does anyone know some good Powerball numbers?


------reply 07/25/99

Nicole, based on the information you provided, you have less than even odds
for acceptance to D.O. school, and less than 1 in 100 odds for acceptance
into an M.D. program. Being a SBF does help a bit. Of course there are ways
to improve your chances. Getting into a graduate program in a medically
related science can help since your undergraduate GPA will no longer be an
important consideration if you do well at the graduate level. A 3.4 is not
too bad if your MCAT score could be improved. I think the "graduate
program" option, along with working very hard to improve your MCAT score, is
your best bet, but it doesn't mean its the only game in town. Another
alternative, is to just work on improving your and MCAT scores, and
reapplying next year. If you were to play a hand consisting of a 3.4 GPA,
and an MCAT score of a 32, I'd wager you'd have about an even chance of
acceptance. To be fair, its hard to make a 32 on the MCAT, but the odds of
winning it all in Powerball are far more remote. You seem like a very
intelligent person, with excellent communication skills -- get an interview,
and these qualities may pay off. Whatever you choose to do, good luck.

 

TOP^
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Copyright © 1999 Richard Hochstim . All rights reserved.


I am currently not responding to email inquires.

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[I]
I have a question regarding Med school admission. I graduated from
dartmouth in 98 and decided upon medicine post-graduation. I

recently received my april MCAT scores and was very pleased.
However, I was thinking of applying next summer instead of this
summer. I have heard in the past that med schools do not accept mcat
scores that are older than 2 years, and do not accept course credit
that is older than 5 years. I don't know if there's any truth to
this, but I'm curious because I would enter med school in the fall of
2001, and my mcats were this past spring. Also, I took my chem
classes my first year of college in the winter of 95. Should I look
into this concern?

brian

------------
The AAMC ''recommends'' that students take the MCAT 18 months before they
expect to enter medical school. The date of the oldest MCAT score considered
by each school can be found in the Medical School Admissions Requirements
Book (more info at http://www.premed411.com/pages/pmr.html), you will need
to add one year to the dates given, so as to correct for a 2001 entrance
date. These corrected dates range from 1994-1999, but could change next
year. It looks like there is no problem, but I would recommend contacting
the schools that ask for the most recent MCAT dates, to see if they would
recommend that you retake the MCAT--I doubt that they will.

Med schools should receive and review all your transcripts. If you were a
graduate student they would focus primarily on your graduate record, but
would also be able to evaluate your undergraduate record. If you have just
an undergraduate record than they would look at that, including those
''ancient'' chem grades.
If you did well on the MCAT, then, unless there is some other compelling
reason for waiting, you should definitely apply next SPRING, NOT next
summer. Good Luck!

-Rich

 

[II]
I am a non traditional student with a BA in English from Boston University.
I am currently finishing up a BS in Physics from Purdue University with a
science GPA of 3.65. I have stellar recommendations, volenteer service, and
I worked for pediatric surgeons for 2 years. I took the MCAT in April, which
turned out to be the worst time in my semester. I did pretty badly. I
still meet the minimum requirements for the schools I want to go to, but the
are just a above minimum. I feel there is a discrepancy between my scores,
grades and experience. I did not release the scores from April because I was
very unsure of my performance at that time. I am going to take it again in
August. When I apply, will both scores be released. If not does that look
bad? (should I just send them both anyway?) Also, I realize academic
stress is not an excuse for doing poorly on the MCAT, but in my case it was.
I am not sure what to say when I am comfronted with this dicrepancy during
interview. Honesty is the best policy for me, but I don't what to seem like
i can't handle it either. Thank you. -Kim

------------

Kim, I think a good strategy is to release your scores if you score a few
points below where you want to be, and to withhold your scores if you did
''pretty badly.'' Your score will not be released unless you request it; see
the 1999 Announcement booklet that came with your MCAT application. What you
need to do is to prepare for, and do well on the August MCAT. When the
''secret'' April MCAT scores come up during an interview, be honest and BRIEF,
but don't make a big deal about it. You have a strong background, if you do
well in August, the April MCAT will only be a big deal if you turn it into
one. Good Luck.

-Rich

 

[III]
I realize that medical schools account for the difficulty of a
student's undergraduate institution so as to keep his/her GPA in
perspective. My question is: How much weight is given to more
competitive universities? Is there any one standard scale used
to determine how much a student's GPA should be inflated or
deflated? Thanks.

--------

For relatively unknown institutions there is a ''formula sheet''.
For better known institutions there is usually no need for one.
The weight given to a particular school's grades varies a bit from
one med school to another. The actual weighting factors are ''trade
secrets''.

-Rich

 

[IV]
Hello Rich, Thank you for taking my email. I am the proud
father of twin daughters. Both attend the University of Pittsburgh at
Johnstown (here in PA) in the field of Bio/Pre-med. Each has
successfully achieved a QPA of above 3.9 through very hard work and
diligence. They are members of the Division II basketball team, are
assistant coaches for a local high school softball team, involved in
the Christian Athletic Association, been inducted into the freshman
honor society, recently honored by UPJ for the ''Student Athlete(s)''
of the year, and inducted in the Golden Key Honor Society ( for
academic excellence) as well as the University of Pittsburgh (at
Pittsburgh) Scholars Award. Now my concern....they both took the MCATs
in April of 99. Just three days ago they received their results and
were very much devastated. Each wants to be a Doctor, one in the field
of Pathology, the other in the field of Orthopedics. One earned a
score of 27, and the other a score of 22. Both have taken up their
summers to go to different hospitals in the area and gain experience
in the medical field....observing, questioning, learning. Right now
they are at the Doylestown Hospital in a program which allows
prospective med-students the opportunity to be exposed, first-hand, to
many of the functions of medical care for the patient. My question is,
and sorry it took so long to get to this, what can I tell my daughters
since they are so emotionally distraught as a result of their MCAT
scores. (I guess I forgot to tell you that they will be Seniors come
this August)....Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for
your time and thoughtfulness.

------------

It sounds like your daughters have an excellent background and are
serious about wishing to pursue careers in medicine. I would explain
to them, that although there are no guarantees, if they work hard at
improving their MCAT scores they have a good chance. There are many
physicians who did not do that well the first time they took the MCAT.
A 27 may be enough to be admitted, but the odds are poor. A 27 could
be brought up to a 30, a competitive score, in time for the August
MCAT, while a 22 probably would require more time to bring up to a
competitive level. Being Seniors is not a major issue as far as
medical schools are concerned, although there may be other issues
associated with graduation, and one's future that come up on a
personal level.

The MCAT is an atypical test in that at least 50% of what is being
tested, is not what you know, but how you apply what you know, to
novel situations. Many good students due poorly the first time they
take the MCAT, even though they worked hard to prepare for it. It has
been my experience that some of these students are able to ''wake up''
to the fact that this style of test requires a different style of
preparation then other tests, including other standardized tests,
which they have taken in the past. In summary, I'd encourage your
daughters by telling them that others have improved their MCAT scores
and they can to, emphasizing that while there are no guarantees, they
have gotten this far, if this is what they want, they need to ''go for
it''. A basketball or softball analogy might even be appropriate.

Best wishes,

Rich

 

[V]
Thanks soooo much RIch for giving me advice..
i do understand now that i should send recommendation letters but is it with
the primary applications that i send it with or is it with the secondary
applications? Or just anytime after the primary applications.. ?
[anytime after
the primary application]

Also another thing that is concerning me is that i haven't taken my mcats
and thus i am worried that the prehalth advisor we have will say that he
can't write me that letter that is needed. Can he write a letter without
having the mcat scores?
[Yes, your MCAT scores will speak for themselves.]
What do you think?
Thanks a again..
[You're welcome.]
Ericka :)

[Rich :]

TOP^

 

[VI]
Rich,

I am currently attending a technical college and have taken a few
classes in order to transfer to a four year institution. This school offers
majors in Biology and Chemistry, which major would give me a better chance at
doing well on the MCAT and trying to get into Med School. Also, how much of
a factor is your high school grades and class ranking a factor in the Med
School selection process. Do your collegiate gpa count more or is it a
combination of MCAT, college gpa, and high school. My grades in high school
were not that great. But the thing is biology and chemistry are a piece of
cake. I need advice and your responce would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Marty

------07/09/99------

Marty,

I have good news, your high school grades and ranking are not important. The
two biggest pre-interview factors relating to medical school admission, are
MCAT and GPA, with the MCAT on average being a bit more important. Although
I love chemistry, and although 47% of Chemistry majors were accepted to Med.
School as opposed to 38% of Biology majors in the 1998-99 entering class, I
think that for most folks a bio. major is a better bet. It is generally
easier to obtain a high GPA with a biology major. A high GPA with a
chemistry major carries more weight, than the same GPA as a biology major,
but if you do not do well in chemistry, the lower GPA will hurt far more
than the chem. major will help. As far as the MCAT, a biology major is more
useful.

On the other hand, in 1998-99, 38% of applicants were bio. majors, while
less than 6% were chem. majors. That means that chem. majors will stand out
when admission decisions are made, and this will be to their advantage.

Here's a trick: If you save your final credits to complete a chem. major
till after your application goes out, you can have your chem. major without
jeopardizing your GPA. Chemistry may not be cake when it comes time for
Physical Chemistry.

Good Luck!

 

[VII]
My nephew is 18, and has just graduated from high school in France,
where he has lived for the past 12 years. He is an American citizen
and completely bilingual. He wants to attend medical school in the
United States, but would prefer to attend college in France. Do you
think this will hurt his chances of acceptance at medical school?
What can he do in the meantime to enhance his chances?

Thanks for any advice you can give.

------07/06/99------

It may hurt his chances. Some schools do not accept credits from foreign
institutions. Other schools who do, may be unable or unwilling to fairly
evaluate your nephew's academic record. Beyond this, my knowledge about this
situation is quite limited. I would recommend contacting the AAMC to find
out more.

-Rich

 

[VIII]
Hello there.

I have a B.A. in Philosophy and I want to go back to school in medicine. I'll
need to complete all the basic science requisites before entering into medical
school. Do you know of programs that exist for a post-baccalaureat who is
working full-time. Have you heard of any 'evening' tracks for people in my
predicament.

Please respond if you get a chance.

Thanks,

Tom

------07/15/99------
A ''post-bac'' program is essentially a premed advisor and a group of classes
and tests that do not conflict with each other. Some schools advertise their
''program'' and others do not, but these schools may still offer courses that
will fit your needs. For example, here in Miami the University of Miami
offers a post-bac program, but it is during the day. I have never heard of
Florida International University mentioning a post-bac program, but since
they cater to older students they offer a lot of evening classes. What you
need to do is to do some research. The internet would be my choice, but much
the same information can be obtained on paper in a library. You will often
obtain only partial information, but based on this information you can
decide to write, call, or email for additional information. What you want to
find is an institution that not only meets your needs, but also maximizes
your chance of entering medical school. Finally, if you can find a premed
advisor who has been in the job for ten years or more, talk to them first
before you start your search, that should save you considerable time. Good
luck.

-Rich

 

[IX]
Dear Rich:

I have been in your site and over looking what you have. I am a physician
assistant and graduated 1998. I am seriously looking to go to medical
school. The one thing is that I have not taken organic chem. or physics.
Without these courses is it possible to get a 26 or higher on the MCAT? I
work full-time in a surgery group and I am not sure if I could take a course
at night. I know that if this is what I want I need to make sacrifices. I
just can't do it right now and I am not getting any younger. With a review
course is it possible? If so, when are they? I live in Miami too.

Please help! Any advice is helpful.
Julie

------07/15/99------

I understand your concerns regarding ''not getting any younger'', but review
courses, no matter how good the course and the teacher, cannot substitute
for organic and physics classes. Review courses are designed to review, not
to teach. I would guess the odds of making a 26, with or without a review
course, to be significantly less than one in twenty. I'm sorry its not what
you wanted to hear, but unless you are extremely gifted in these areas, the
odds are not in your favor.

-Rich

 

[X]
> Dear Rich:
> I am kind of in a bind about my app, and I want to know if I would have
> better luck playing craps in Vegas than med school. Oh, I am applying for
> the first time. I just sent off my AMCAS application on July 15. It took me
> so long to get the money, I never felt so poor. The thing is this: I feel so
> shaky about it being gone. Did I do everything right? My school (I graduated
> in May) was ABSOLUTELY NO HELP WHATSOEVER! I felt like I was drowning and no
> one threw a LifeSaver. The pre-med committee made it a point to take out a
> can of verbal whop-ass on anyone who didn't have a 4.0 . I went at it alone:
> I went to Lucent freshman year and did some webpage designs, got laid off
> (I'm 18 and I got laid off, mergers....) I went to U of Cinn. in OH
> sophomore year and did environmental work (Clean up the Ohio river near
> Applachia) I went to CWRU junior year and did some shadowing throught MMEP,
> now I am out of school and I work for J&J and drug lobbysits, where I
> network with senators and drug company CEOs and get them to make the issue
> of using, taking, and selling OTC and prescips not so bad to the public. I
> had (as of 6/1/99) a 3.4 GPA, and a 23,S on the MCAT. I am not sure if race
> matters anymore with Affirmative Action the guillitone over my head, but I
> am a 21 yr. SBF. If anyone can be honest, and NOT HARSH, I would be really
> grateful. Otherwise, does anyone know some good Powerball numbers?


------reply 07/25/99

Nicole, based on the information you provided, you have less than even odds
for acceptance to D.O. school, and less than 1 in 100 odds for acceptance
into an M.D. program. Being a SBF does help a bit. Of course there are ways
to improve your chances. Getting into a graduate program in a medically
related science can help since your undergraduate GPA will no longer be an
important consideration if you do well at the graduate level. A 3.4 is not
too bad if your MCAT score could be improved. I think the "graduate
program" option, along with working very hard to improve your MCAT score, is
your best bet, but it doesn't mean its the only game in town. Another
alternative, is to just work on improving your and MCAT scores, and
reapplying next year. If you were to play a hand consisting of a 3.4 GPA,
and an MCAT score of a 32, I'd wager you'd have about an even chance of
acceptance. To be fair, its hard to make a 32 on the MCAT, but the odds of
winning it all in Powerball are far more remote. You seem like a very
intelligent person, with excellent communication skills -- get an interview,
and these qualities may pay off. Whatever you choose to do, good luck.

 

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